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Do I Need Planning Permission for my Log Cabin?

Will I need planning permission to erect my garden building in my garden?

You don't usually need planning permission for domestic outbuildings, as long as they are used for a domestic purpose related to your house. However, you may require planning permission if any of the following apply (the list is not exhaustive, so if in doubt please check with your local planning authority):

  • If you plan to erect the shed within 5 metres of any part of your house.
  • If the total area of the ground covered by any buildings or other structures in the garden area (excluding the original, main house) is greater than 50% of the total garden area.
  • If there is a condition in the original planning consent for your property which states that garden sheds/outhouses etc. cannot be erected with or without the consent of the local planning authority.
  • If your property is a listed building or within a conservation area or an area of outstanding natural beauty. If this is the case, you will need to contact your local planning authority as development will be restricted.
  • If you plan to run a business from the building, or use it to store goods in connection with a business.
  • In addition, no part of the garden building should be nearer to the public highway than the existing house, or any point 20 metres from that highway, whichever is nearer to the highway.

Do I need any other kind of consent?

If your property is a listed building or in a conservation area, it is likely you will need the appropriate listed building/conservation area consent.

In some cases, properties can be subject to "restrictive covenants", preventing building in your back garden. You should check whether there are any restrictions on the property register at HM Land Registry against this type of development. If you fall into this category, the consent of the person with the benefit of the restrictive covenant should be sought.

The current planning permission at your property may contain a condition that negates permitted development rights. Such conditions sometimes apply en masse to the surrounding area. Check with your local planning authority.

If you are not sure whether you can erect your garden building without planning permission, we suggest you err on the side of caution and call your local planning authority. In most cases you will be given an answer straightaway.

 

For more information, visit the Government Planning Portal (Applies to England).

 

*** We accept no liability for the accuracy of any information supplied in this customer notice and you are always advised to seek professional advice. ***